“OnTime” and the Agile Manifesto, my experience

Tenant #3:

 Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale.

OnTime 2010:

Since OnTime gives me the ability to modularize my development efforts, I usually find myself packaging my features into deliverable components.   The one thing I don’t like about the “feature ids” is that they keep increasing as you add new features even if you have started a new project.  I have been unable to find a way to reinitialize the “feature id” value when I start a new project.  I would prefer my “feature ids” being project specific and not for all projects in my work space.  I guess this would be fine for a very large project made up of many sub projects.  However, in my case I work with smaller self contained projects that are independent efforts.  Coming back to the idea of frequent delivery of working software, I believe OnTime has definitely helped me.

Tenant #4:

 Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project.

OnTime 2010:

The tool allows you to add as many users as you want along with their user security roles, method of authentication, and status.     The security roles include:

  • Administrator
  • Developer
  • Limited admin (use in addition to other roles)
  • Product Owner
  • Project Manager
  • Scrum Master
  • Stakeholder
  • Support Engineer
  • Tester

One user is permitted to belong to multiple roles.  So it would be very easy to create a security role for your business users and assign them to either the Product Manager role or the Stakeholder role as needed.  In my case I use this tool on my technical team and don’t have the business users logging into it.  However, I do intend to include the business folks, at least the Business Analyst (BA) in the group of users with access to the project planning tool, on my next project. Yep, I must agree that allowing stakeholders to access the project plan is a cool way to increase productivity and reduce the feedback loop, thus leading to the creation of a better product.  I believe the lack of continuous collaboration between developers and business folks is one of the key weaknesses of the “Waterfall” software development project management methodology.

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3 Responses to “OnTime” and the Agile Manifesto, my experience

  1. Allison says:

    Agile Antipattern: Changing the Definition of Done Bob Hartman discusses how the prrssuee to meet deadlines is simply deficit spending on your project with a bill that will get paid off sooner than you think.

  2. Amir says:

    Agile Antipattern: Changing the Definition of Done Bob Hartman discusses how the prseruse to meet deadlines is simply deficit spending on your project with a bill that will get paid off sooner than you think.

  3. Michelle says:

    The agility you refer to here is the prpcinile reason I work for myself and not a large corporation. I can’t stand red tape and time wasting.

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